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Comment: Updated example
  • Let functions with only one variable declaration can be defined on one line.

    No Formatcode
    
    Let ( ~someVar = FunctionalArea » Tablename::fieldName ; If ( ~someVar = "Active"; True; False ) )
    
  • Example #1 Let function with indenting

    No Format

    - Brackets on dedicated lines.

    Code Block
    Let (
            [
                ~privateVariable = List ( "one" ; "two" ; "three" );
                $localVariable = Substitute ( ~privateVariable ; [ ¶ ; "," ] );
                $$globalVariableTopValue = GetValue ( ~privateVariable ; 1 )
            ];
                "Your Let function result is " & $localVariable
    )
  • Example #2 Let function with indenting - Initial bracket on same line as Let function with inline notes.

    Code Block
    Let ( [
                // Notes about variables below
                ~privateVariable = List ( "one" ; "two" ; "three" );
                $localVariable = Substitute ( ~privateVariable ; [ ¶ ; "," ] );
     
                /*
                  Use extra lines and embedded block comments
                  if more information is needed to describe
                  what is going on with the calculation logic!
                */
                $$globalVariableTopValue = GetValue ( ~privateVariable ; 1 )
            ];
                "Your Let function result is " & $localVariable
    )
  • Let functions with multiple variables use both opening and closing brackets on their own lines
    Note: both opening and closing brackets should be indented to stand out.

    No Format
    
    Let (
            [
                variable = expression
            ];
                "result is indented 2 tabs"
    )
    

    good

    No Format
    Let ( [

    acceptable

    No Format
    
    Let (
    [
    

    bad

    Because the standard started out with the opening bracket on the same line as the function name, yet does not impede readability, it can be considered the shorthand version and perfectly acceptable.

  • Closing Let variable declarations end on their own line. This indicates the start of the result.

    No Format
    ];

    good

    No Format
    endOfFunction ) ];

    bad

  • Calculation scoped variables use camelCase and are identified by a preceding variable indicator of ~ (tilde). The ~ character in these standards represents the private scope.
    This makes it easy to distinguish calculation variables from custom function arguments, $variables, and Table::fieldNames

    No Format
    ~someVariable

    good

    No Format
    someVariable

    bad

  • Use present tense verbs or adjectives to indicate Boolean variable status on both calculation and locally scoped variables.

    No Format
    
    $hasReturns
    ~isTrailing
    $containsSpaces
    not ~containsEmailAddress